CATHOLIC DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAS
CONNECTICUT STATE COURT
CHARITY AND UNITY ~  ARLINE RICH, STATE REGENT


The Catholic Daughters of the Americas (CDA) was started in Utica, New York in 1903 by John E. Carberry and other Knights of Columbus with the goal of establishing a sorority for Catholic women to spread the primary principles of Unity and Charity.


​Five years later, the CDA grew rapidly, establishing a total of 90 courts and over 10,000 members in 18 states throughout the U.S.


​The CDA was very active during both World War I and II, acting as nurses and servicewomen in alliance with the Red Cross and having involvement in issues such as:

  • juvenile delinquency
  • democracy
  • peace
  • postwar America
  • labor and the war
  • women in the industry
  • help for students in China
  • racism
  • the Equals Rights Amendment
  • federalized education


​In 1954, the CDA went international. After Bishop Fulton J. Sheen challenged the CDA to extend their reach beyond the U.S. boarders, his challenge was answered with an expansion of members to Puerto Rico, Mexico, Guam and the Virgin Islands.


​Today the CDA has nearly 75,000 members in 1,250 local courts who volunteer annually to raise money for the education and training of seminarians, helping with the causes that Habitat for Humanity provides, disaster relief, SOAR (Support Our Aging Religious) program and many more charitable causes. For the full story of our history, visit our national site at www.catholicdaughters.org

Our History